One Pot Method 101

The most traditional method of trail cooking is by using a lightweight pot to cook your meal in. By incorporating the methods of FBC into it you can avoid lengthy cook times (and pot scrubbings) as well you can save fuel. This method is attractive to long distance hikers and to those avoiding the use of plastics.

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One Pot Method:

To save time, at home bag each meal up. You can use snack and sandwich bags for this. Be sure to mark with a permanent marker or tuck a small note inside that notes what the meal is and how much water is called for.

Add the water called for, any oil and meat to your pot. In some cases the recipe will call for the dried vegetables or the dried ingredients to be added as well. Follow the recipe directions to be sure. Bring the water to a boil, turn off your stove and add in the dry items. Stir well and cover tightly. At altitude or in cooler tempatures you will want to consider using a pot cozy to insulate your pot (it retains quite a bit of heat in). You can make your own or buy them ready to go from Anti Gravity Gear.

The cleaning of your pot is easier this way than if you do regular cooking, where you simmer for a lengthy time, such as 10 to 20 minutes. When done, wipe out with a paper towel and then rinse with a mild mixture of outdoor safe soap/water. If you use a non-stick pot you often won’t need a scrubby pad.

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